Demystifying UX Design — Part 1: Don’t Worry About Long Pages and Many Clicks

There are many common beliefs about UX design that are, unfortunately, based on casual and inaccurate observation. However, through systematically planned and conducted user research, we can see that some of these could not be further from the truth. In this series, I’d like to single out a few such design beliefs that meet two conditions:

  1. Many product development professionals believe them.
  2. Little user data supports them.

Such ideas may not be completely wrong—just oversimplified. But, if UX designers applied them indiscriminately, adherence to them would undermine user engagement and task completion. While many experienced UX designers have already realized the problems that result from adhering to these ideas, many others still firmly believe in them. In debunking these UX design myths, I’ll show that they’re just half truths that don’t fully account for the complexity of user experience and that there are better alternatives for achieving your design objectives.

There’s No Need to Worry About Long Pages

“Many designers are overly concerned about page length, thinking that long pages impair information discovery.”

Many designers are overly concerned about page length, thinking that long pages impair information discovery. Much too often, I’ve heard, “The page is too long, users won’t scroll down.” This is not necessarily the case. Based on hundreds of user interviews that I’ve conducted, user expectations and contextual cues guide users’ behavior. You need not worry about long pages, as long as users know they should scroll down.

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Read the entire Demystifying UX Design series

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One Response to Demystifying UX Design — Part 1: Don’t Worry About Long Pages and Many Clicks

  1. Busting myths! Excellent article to reiterate a common misconception. Visual cues and smart design layouts can help in consuming information on long scrolling pages. I like how several iPad apps use subtle visual cues that help indicate additional information is below the viewable space as seen in many digital magazines.

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